2.7. Migrating GnuCash data

Sometimes you may need to move your financial data and GnuCash settings to another machine. Typical use cases are when you buy a new computer or if you want to use the same settings over two different operating systems in a dual boot configuration.

2.7.1. Migrating financial data

Migrating GnuCash financial data is a as simple as copying .gnucash files with a file manager if you know where they are saved. If you can’t remember where a file is stored but you can open it directly within GnuCash, save it in the desired path from within GnuCash.

All other files in the folder are either backups or log files. It won’t do any harm to copy them too, but it’s not likely to do any good, either.

2.7.2. Migrating preferences data

There are three different folders with supporting files: one for GnuCash preferences, one for reports, and one for online banking settings. Preferences are managed by gconf, reports are managed by GnuCash itself, and online banking is managed by aqbanking. If you do not use online banking, then you will not have this folder on your machine.

The paths where the GnuCash preferences files are stored vary depending on your operating system (see Table 2.1, “Application Settings Locations”, Table 2.2, “Saved Reports Locations”, and Table 2.3, “Online Banking Settings Locations”). To back up and transfer your entire installation, you must copy these folders as well.

Table 2.1. Application Settings Locations

Operating systemfolder
Mac OSX~/.gconf/apps/gnucash
WindowsDocuments and Settings/Username/.gconf/apps/gnucash

Table 2.2. Saved Reports Locations

Operating systemfolder
Mac OSX~/Library/Application Support/gnucash
WindowsDocuments and Settings/Username/.gnucash

Table 2.3. Online Banking Settings Locations

Operating systemfolder
Mac OSX~/.aqbanking
WindowsDocuments and Settings/Username/.aqbanking


On Unix and Mac OSX, these folders will generally not display in the file manager. You must set the file manager to show hidden files and folders to see them.


On Unix and Mac OSX, the ~ symbol means the home folder.